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show for you tonight. our guest diane ravitch here to talk bed case and he education reform. ladies and gentlemen, there are many consequence to its growing cascade of revelations about our nation's spying activities. most recently the bugging of german chancellor angela merkel's cell phone and lederhossen drawers. (laughter) united states pretended to be her onlean boy friend for two years. two years-- ! but perhaps i never realized how acute and dire the fallout of this may be until i saw this shocking story. >> russian leaders are denying reports of spying on overseas leaders. they are accused of passing out bugged gift bags at last month's g-20 summit. >> jon: bugged gift bags! before all these revelations we could have jumped all over this story with good old-fashioned american con desession and smug superiority, thrown out a little boris and natasha reference. done a little yaukoff smirnoff, in russia gift bag rummage through you, but now-- (laughter) i can only smear at how ham handed their spying is. >> delegates were given usb pem ree sticks and phone chargers equipped with
of education at nyu also an author, her latest book sell called reign of error the hopes of the privatization and danger of america's public school, please welcome back to the program, diane ravitch. >> hello. >> thank you. >> how are you? >> great, thank you. wonderful. >> nice to see you again. >> wonderful, was laughing my head off at the earlier segment, loved it. >> really quite amusing, we are. we work on that for at least an hour and a half a day. >> reign of error the hopes of the privatization movement and danger to america's public school. for me the most surprising thing in the book is you spend a great deal of time, one of the assumptions that we make in this country is that the public education system is broken. you make the case here that it's not correct. >> actually, no, it's not true at all. what i did was to look at all the data and i found out that the test scores today are the highest ever in history. graduation rates highest ever in history. dropout rates lowest ever in history and i came to the conclusion that kids today are, in fact, the smartest generation yet. >> jon:
and an improvement in the education system. >> can the government actually come up with bold policies if these vested interests actually come up against opposition? >> well, what is happening in china right now, the leaders in beijing are trying to leverage the state council's recent proposal to try to consolidate and amplify public opinion ahead of the meeting that's supposed to reform. we're pretty skeptical these measures will be adequately addressed in a four-day weekend, but we're convinced china can achieve a consumer-driven economy. we believe policies next week that would address the social security system, to address the family registration system and the land right policies will help china move forward on its economic rebalancing act. >> the third plenary session will begin on saturday next week in beijing. >>> japan's new car sales rose in october for the second straight month. that was due to strong demand for mini vehicles and introduction of new hybrid models. auto industry officials say sales totalled more than 420,000 vehicles last month, up 17% year on year. auto sales had been slowi
a month to about two weeks. visa seekers who work in fields such as business, education, and culture no longer have to submit invitation letters issued by the russian government. multiple entry visas will also be extended from one to three years. the number of japanese firms that have made inroads into russia has more than doubled in the last ten years. and the japanese foreign ministry says it expects that trend to gather speed. >>> iran's supreme leader has backed his president's push for nuclear negotiations. 8 toll ayatollah khomenei warned hard-liners not to accuse president rouhani of compromising with the united states. he recalled the seizure in 1979 of the u.s. embassy in iran. he said young irann called the embassy a den of spies. he said they were ahead of their time after recent allegations about u.s. intelligence activities. but he said no one should consider iranian negotiators as compromisers. they'll resume nuclear talks on thursday with their counterparts from six world powers, including the u.s. >> translator: these negotiators are on a difficult mission, and they'r
on children. nearly 3 million are at risk. many lack safe drinking water, health care and education. 2 out of 3 children have had to leave school. more than 1 million have fled the country with their families. 2 out of 5 of those children have no access to education. >>> now together in this studio is edward chiban, unicef's director for emergency programs. he's in charge of coordinating assistance in and outside of the country. thank you for coming to the studio today. you have just heard those numbers. what's the reality behind them? >> well, the reality behind those numbers is really children are at the center of this crisis. we have over 4 million that have been directly affected by the conflict. that's more than twice the population of tokyo's children. imagine, each one of them affected by the conflict. we're talking about children that no long ver access to health services, that have not been immunized in two years. children that have dropped out of school. we estimate inside syria more than 2 million children have dropped out of education. and behind those numbers, each of these ch
. unicef says many lack safe drinking water, health care and education. two out of three children have had to leave school. more than a million have fled the country with their families, two out of five of those children have no access to education. cases of polio have been reported in the country's eastern province. the head of unicef's emergency coordination says they have just started an immunization campaign but they don't know if they can >> the most urgent right now is to access those children both inside syria and subregion with health services, making sure those health services can go crossline to reach children wherever they are. >> reporter: with increasingly fractious opposition groups dividing the country, the number of children with no access to outside support is on the rise. but the apparently successful mission of u.n. chemical weapons inspectors inside syria has given some hope to humanitarian aid groups, including unicef. >> the importance of advocating with those with influence on the parties to the conflict, to allow access for humanitarian aid workers, the chemical wea
. some of it must have been the result of his jesuit education and his experience as a debater. a friend of his is here who knew him and debated with him and told me that at 16, he was just a wonderful, great man, even though he was just a young man at that time. i never knew, really, exactly why he always knew the right thing to say and do. perhaps it was his honesty and his resolve to keep his word. i do not know. i think back on our almost 45 years together and i think of the long meanings -- meetings that perhaps best displayed his ability to reason with people. 'ability to reason with people. one of them was in the old -- in the late 1960's. he had accepted the challenge of a man whose name i think was virgil. who was opposed to any form of gun control. he claimed thanh was -- tom was for every form of gun control. , agreed to appear at this forum at this local high school. virgil as in the newspapers, "i was able to attract -- i think he also wrote on radio and television -- an audience of about 700 people, tom stood on the stage 45.5 hours and answered all of the allegations with
constructive on the united states and where we spend a great deal of time is our educational system, which unfortunately a lot of people malign that today. this will be discussed later, but we actually have more students overseas than any other country in our educational system. what you come here? it is not just the quality of education, but the type of education. some of the disadvantages of education globally, so many people are taught rote or talk facts. this may work very well or testing scores, and i'm not trying to diminish that at all. but i do believe that the advantage of the american style of learning, which should get more credit, is the ability to be thoughtful and critical thinking. as an employer who hired 1100 employees this year, i will tell you over 80% of our employees come from u.s. universities. we will continue to have that position. as an employer who has offices in 38 countries, the bulk of our employees come from the united states universities, and what we are looking for, people who know how to think and think creatively. >> thank you, larry. let's shift to bill.
in the transpacific free trade talks. >>> google launches education for students. google started the program jointly with a non profit organization. the company's executive chairman eric schmitt visited a high school tuesday to mark the occasion. >> it's interesting that japan is fourth or so in the world in science education which is great. united states is way low. >> he told the students japan has the potential and technology to be a leader in soft wire development. he encouraged them to study and help each other find a solution when faced with a challenge. students tried out computer programming with the mpo staff using a $30 pc developed in britain. they learned developing skills to make the cats on the screen move freely. >> translator: i've never done computer programming so i assumed it was difficult. when i tried it, it was really fun. >> google plans to make the program available for more than 25,000 children across japan over the next year. >>> the reserve bank of india is trying to combat rising prices in asia's second most popular economy. it decided to raise the key interest rate tuesd
education systems in the world, education is a strange thing, at 18 you take one exam and that one exam makes a gigantic difference in that life if you get in particular universities you have much of a better chance of getting into a good company that runs the economy, what is happening is people are preparing manically for that test and they prep, women as a result have fewer children because the cost of trying to teach people this and the result of a career is people who often are successful but running out of people, the birthrate is going down so it is a weird thing, it is not just a standard economics of people getting more successful, and there are all kinds of straings quilts within it that are making a difference as to how things turn out. >> rose: i remember talking to yu in singapore where the demographics were changing and they had a certain attitude about immigration, which they had to change because they needed immigration, and migration for their own economy. >> i think it is very, very important, in the developing of what -- what is happening in asia, and possibly what i
at the board of education meeting. she hopes to attend vanderbilt university to study medicine and one day join doctors without borders. i wish her luck in her future endeavors and i know she will make our fourth district proud. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from michigan is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this week unfortunately food stamps will be cut by $5 billion. we expected that. mr. kildee: what's worse is even more deeper cuts could follow. conferees start negotiating a farm bill this week, and billions of dollars -- in fact, $40 billion have been -- in cuts have been proposed by republicans in the house. 10 times the amount of cuts passed in the bipartisan bill in the senate. i've talked to dozens of people in my district who since i've been here in congress have come up to me and said, you know, thank you for fighting to preser
mitigated conflicts across a rack -- across iraq. why would with the foundations of civic education and human rights for the institutions of education. u.s. ap is part of the partnerships we we have made. a lot remains to be done in iraq. the road ahead will not the easy. your excellency, we assure you and the iraqi people that as a rock prepares for the 2016 elections, iraq can count on the support of the u.s. institute of peace is a partner on all levels. starting with the communities, to local councils, two dialogues. thank you. [applause] >> i would like to ask beth jones to come forward. the format today will be an introduction of the prime minister by ambassador beth jones. then the prime minister will speak. and then sit and take questions. the audience already knows this. if you have questions, perhaps he of written them out, we are not going to have time for a great number of questions, but hopefully the prime minister will find questions interesting. with that, libby turn it over. >> thank you very much. welcome to the delegation. especially welcome, it is great to be here
the task of giving kids an equal education. -- dedicated to accomplishing the task of giving kids an equal education. they said they were going to back off of strong civil rights enforcement. i had to make a decision. do i uphold the law or back off of my principal? ini fight for what i believe or do i sacrifice my job? i lost my job. but i have never regretted the decision is standing for what you believe in. [applause] i went back to monterey and public service was still in my veins so i ran for congress and served a terms of the congress. eight terms. it was a different congress. el.er tip o'neill, bob michae we just honored tom foley the other day, speaker and a majority leader. republicans and democrats work together. toy work together to try solve the problems facing this country. yes, they had their differences. yes, they had their politics. when it came to issues affecting the country, they worked together for the common good and that's the way our democracy should work. [applause] clinton asked me then to take over the office of management and budget. the good people there helped
in getting it into the education system and am wondering if you could talk about that along with the press that we need to get people interested because it's all about selling new ideas. we don't talk about complexity. we live in a complex system. finally, last night i saw a play called "love in afghanistan." i think it's one of the most powerful plays of ever seen and i'm a performing arts junkie. i recommend everyone to go see it. it was fabulous. it addresses the things were talking about. >> it's a really important point. somebody brought over some young afghan music students about six months ago. it was terrific. we brought them to the capital so that some of my colleagues could see. i think there were like eight students on afghan instruments at a music school which could have never existed and they are there preserving their heritage. it has an impact when people can see a play or whatever, of course it does. telling stories are important. the problem on the other side is i'm not a good storyteller, by the way. i admire those of my colleagues who are. it's the most powerful way to g
a security guard and that's the persona of safety. >> reporter: the u.s. department of education under title 9 of the civil rights acts says institutions receiving federal funds must insure an education free of sexual discrimination. many colleges and universities say they weren't unaware of their legal obligations under title 9 to also protect students from sexual assault. >> we absolutely put much more emphasis on preventing plagiarism than preventing rape. that is a reality. >> reporter: annie graduated and in 2012 she and andrea found each other. they began to talk about the issue of rape at the university of north carolina. >> unc is not a bad place. it's representation of a larger cultural problem. >> reporter: the women began researching title 9, interfering other victims of rape, utilizing social media, and in january o of 2013 a lot of within former unc administrator melinda manning and two others they filed a federal complaint against the university of north carolina at the department of education. >> when you have 18- and 19-year-old men and women who are holding the government ac
impoverished poorly educated and rural girls are more likely to become pregnant. early preg nansies reflect powerlessness, poverty and pressure. in most cases the results of sexual vialance and owe -- voilens and coercion. for thousands of girls teenage preg nansies results in human rights violations - that is death. >> 70,000 die from causes relating to pregnancy and child birth. we have this report from a shelter in nairobi that has been helping underage mother. >> at the age of 14 this girl is a mother. her family disowned her. she is now forced to care for a 4-month-old and studying for school exams. >> translation: i'm lucky i had a safe delivery. i haven't lost hope. i plan to continue my studies until i complete them. >> beth now lives at the shelter for teenage mothers, outside nairobi. it's run by this man. the rever and. >> 99" of girls we have here are from poor families. por erty plays a great role whereby the families are poor, and you bring another mouth. you go away. >> teenage preg nansies in africa contributed to a lack of sex education. child marriage prevalent in some co
to cope with that. she was better educated most had grabher school education with the hitler youth for girls with secretarial trading work to help out on farms or restaurants or working class but of the other hand in ned got her law degree in the 30's which was pretty unusual. and she decided which she was called upon to do her patriotic duty that she played joy in the red cross that during the first world war had the organization that attracted upper-class women associates said i will go to the red cross. low and behold she did not have medical trading but was pulled out because they immediately noticed she was cultured and said we will set up the leadership the special soldiers' homes in the we are area of the occupied territory. this is from her personal album. soldiers go to a friend then returning can have stopovers with german cookies in to interact with nice german women to relax and recreates so there were 1200 german women like her sent to the east to manage the soldier holmes in she was said to to a town that had a population of about 9,000 jews. shortly before she went o
towards education that is not just a piece of paper, you really have to know how to do thing. then the subject came up in the mexican family. mexican family is a very strong unit in our country. and women at home have been the keystone holding families together. now, with the entrance of mexico into the modern world, there's a pressure on women to not only be a homemaker but also a bread winner. so that puts enormous pressure on women. and frankly, i don't think we value that, all they do correctly. because it's very difficult -- >> rose: what you intended to say was and perhaps you said and it was misconstrued was that we need to value what women do because they're working not only outside the home but they work inside the home too and they're called on to do more than men are called on. >> precisely. >> rose: so maybe the an is men should take a bigger role at home some women would say. >> it comes back to valuing work. sometimes there's a feeling that if a woman says well i work at home, i'm a homemaker night it -- >> rose: it doesn't have the same value. >> that's the
'm going to be able to become to doing so. in education system afghanistan, not just higher education, but so many universities that the number of them even to me as counterintuitive so i don't use them. before you get to colleges and universities and before the taliban and was driven out, and they said they have been, 9000 now onethe schools am million. about 3 million of them are girls but none of them could have been educated before we got there with our allies. 2001, there were 20,000 teachers, all-male. there are now 200,000 teachers, 60,000 of them are women. improved., much child mortality, significantly down. 5 million afghan refugees fled to pakistan and have returned .ome is it that 67% of the american people in the most recent survey think the afghan war was not worth fighting? how does that happen? the picture is much, much better number.t i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or more full picture of the events in afghanistan. i believe the press has missed a good story. it has not missed of the problems but it has missed the progress. the impressio
an education model to reverse the trend. >> chinook middle school applied for and received several grants, using the money for teacher training. test scores since then have gone up, using the same teachers and staff. >> one is providing expectation for the kids, that they can do it, putting a great teacher in front of the students, day in, day out. and looking at the time of the day, to make sure you maximise the time that the kids are learning and involving the parents to the greater degree in the education. >> experts say funding is an important part of the equation. >> raising standards is good, but oftentimes those problems come with an injection of resources. >> many schools receive the same amount of funding or less than a decade ago. the poverty report doesn't signal all doom and cloom. it means schools have to work smarter. >> it's stuff that is already happening to create successful kids in other schools, making it available for everyone. jennifer believes in that philosophy. >> one of my favourite quotes is it's going to be hard, but it will be worth it. i think if they leave he
among educated people. if you have much idea why europe exploded, though they may know that a big league with an extravagant mustache got shot. the most widely held belief is that the conflict was simply a guessing mistake for which all the european powers share blame, it's folly compounded by the british incompetence of military commanders. this is what i would characterize as the poets greuel, first articulated by the likes of robert graves amid the modern blood they felt that no cause could be worth the slaughter. today some brave people and maybe also saw americans feel almost embarrassed that we finished up on the witness -- winning side, yet my own opinion is somewhat different. while the war was assuredly a colossal tragedy, there was a cause a stake. certainly, britain could not possibly have remained neutral, while germany secured e-germany over the continent. a german victory in world war -- world war i will simply have created something like the european union half a century earlier. that we, the british, not to mention the united states could have remained unbloodied by stand
-high school education. ren says wages are not his main consideration. and he's not ready to give up. he continues to send his resumes to potential employers. >> translator: nobody wants to give up their dream. mine is to find a job that i really want to do. >> reporter: the number of university students in china will keep rising. finding work for the country's best minds is essential for the nation's advancement. nhk world. >>> an extremely powerful winds are causing severe situations in europe today. let's turn to mai shoji at the weather desk for the latest. >> hello there. it's halloween week. a freakish storm is affecting and battering most of northern europe. take a look at this video coming out from a couple of places. belgians hunkered down on monday and faced hurricane-force winds. take a look at this. a savage coastal storm, strongest in years and more than a dozen people lost their lives in europe. travelers were left stranded at brussels airport. meanwhile, gusts of 160 kilometers per hour recorded in southern england. hundreds of trees were knocked down and public transporta
case and he education reform. ladies and gentlemen, there are many consequence to its growing cascade of revelations about our nation's spying activities. most recently the bugging of german chancellor angela merkel's cell phone and lederhossen drawers. (laughter) and the fact that the united states pretended to be her onlean boy friend for two years. two years-- ! but perhaps i never realized how acute and dire the fallout of this may be until i saw this shocking story. >> russian leaders are denying reports of spying on overseas leaders. they are accused of passing out bugged gift bags at last month's g-20 summit. >> jon: bugged gift bags! before all these revelations we could have jumped all over this story with good old-fashioned american con desession and smug superiority, thrown out a little boris and natasha reference. done a little yaukoff smirnoff, in russia gift bag rummage through you, but now-- (laughter) i can only smear at how ham handed their spying is. >> delegates were given usb pem ree sticks and phone chargers equipped with spywear. >> if you're a world leader and y
their best match for their education and bottom line. for the right match. we take a look. >> tricia the daughter of immigrants from india hopes to one day become a pete yeah trigs. she is a premed major at queens college, who lives at home. her tuition is just under $6,000 a year, which is all her family can afford. the president of queens college says it provides large amount of student aid so students don't have to pick off job to pay their tuition. >> we are getting students from very modest means first in their family to go to college, maybe first in the country, without us they wouldn't be able to transcend their particular situation. financial planner says cost has everything to do with how families pick schools. >> from working class families they are selected the colleges based on the affordable, bases on the convenience of their son or daughter commuting. >> with tuition on the rise, many families are looking at where they can get the most bang for the buck. the washington monthly has produced one of many lists that ranked colleges on just that. and queens college is number
services. the one thing we try to do in the aca is give more money for graduate medical education to encourage more folks to it to medical school. host: our guest, congress woman diana degette, serves the first district of colorado, democrat . she is the top democrat on the oversight and investigations subcommittee. we will go to paul next in pittsburgh, republican caller. hi, paul. caller: good morning. i would like to start thinking c-span for allowing us to have this unfiltered conversation that is important for the people to hear all of this. , ipent 30 years in the navy will be very brief. when the admiral was running an exercise, we would write the plan and then he would just call all the department heads in and go over all the details until he was completely satisfied that this was going to be executed properly. we call that leadership. it is an ingredient that apparently is missing in our government at the top level. it is inconceivable to me that you could after having the time that you had to roll this plan out to have this kind of a disaster, and everybody to deny knowl
work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. the end. lovely read susan. but isn't it time to turn the page on your cup of joe? gevalia, or a cup of johan, is like losing yourself in a great book. may i read something? yes, please. of course. a rich, never bitter taste cup after cup. net weight 340 grams. [ sighs ] [ chuckles ] [ announcer ] always rich, never bitter. gevalia. filibuster at the state capital, a state judge in texas struck down a restrictive part of the abortion law deeming it unconstitutional. the judge appointed by george w. bush blocked texas from enforcing restriction that would have required doctors performing abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. had the requirement gone into effect it could force clinics to close. the act is without a rational basis, the judge wrote and places a substantial obstacle i
, and the council on foreign relations working on a range of economics and education issues. he is the co-author of a book on girls education and an author of the pro-growth progressive and economic strategy for shared prosperity. gene graduated from the university of minnesota and yale law school and attended wharton business school. is a native of ann arbor, michigan, and will be joining his them in california at the end of this year. when he finishes his remarks will move over here for two and a. thank you very much. gene? >> well, thank you very much for having us here today. i want to thank jim doyle very much, not just for today but for all the leadership of business forward, all the consultations, even the recent meeting with your small business advisory committee as we went into this recent round of budget discussions. so again, i really want to thank you and business forward for the leadership that you've shown, and the desire to look beyond your own particular situation to the larger economic issue that we face as a country, and understanding that that affects all of us. so agai
care allow, just as thousands say they are losing their current plans. >> getting more educational bang for your buck. do those college rankings really help finding the best college for your budget? >> coming up in sports, lebron james and the miami heat unveiled another championship banner. we'll have the heights in just a bit. conversation in a live town-hall event. sex crimes on campus, a special week of coverage and live town-hall on america tonight nine eastern. only on al jazeera america. (vo) friday night ... >> does the nsa collect any type of data on millions of americans? >> no sir. (vo) fault lines investigates what it's like to live under the watchful eye of the nsa. >> they know everything that you do, everything that you think, everything that you fear. they know how to manipulate and control you. the state has all the power. >> we have done more to destroy our way of life than the terrorists could ever have done. >> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. in just about a half hour, the health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius is going to testify b
, and believe it or not, they also are seeing a lot of educated college educated people. carol? >> rosa flores reporting live for us this morning. >>> still to come in "cnn newsroom," remember this, the last u.s. bat troops to leave iraq? today there are new calls from iraq for a return to the u.s. military. they need help. we'll tell you more, next. the secret is out. hydration is in. [ female announcer ] only aveeno daily moisturizing lotion has an active naturals oat formula that creates a moisture reserve so skin can replenish itself. aveeno® naturally beautiful results. aveeno® help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. they're not usually this thin, this li
and -- as the center of who we are as a nation. transforming education and economically driven immigration system and energy policy based on north american resources and american ingenuity and committed family life over start prosperity for many americans to what we had today. there is another important part of this. economic freedom in all of its forms will sustain prosperity over the long haul. no one understood that editor -- that better than jack. driving american supply-side economic and carrying -- tearing down the barriers in the capital leftm for those who are behind. those policies lead to exponential growth that we the leadership of ronald reagan. many people benefited from that .rowth than what we have today conservatives need to advance economic freedom for this of a vacation of the tax code and lower tax rates. these of the lost productivity, the lost jobs, misallocated capital from the convoluted tax code in the world. conservatives need to advance economic freedom through advocating a monetary policy that does not punish savers and job creating small businesses. our current policy
every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. to roll out a perfectly flaky crust that's made from scratch. or mix vegetables with all white meat chicken and homemade gravy. but marie callender's does. just sit down and savor. marie callender's. it's time to savor. just sit down and savor. so if ydead battery,t tire, need a tow or lock your keys in the car, geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. medicare open enrollment. of year again. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better cov
knew it takes the stance of this nothing new i needed it. i'm very active fish in education right now and then me. he thinks is artificial. we think so because it's not a surprise anyone to expect from spies spiciness by itself. and as i spy is obvious the spying and analyze the cousin of the nolan and i can shift it can become any meaning to me that the americans spying and john in signing the germans did not surprise the aqua live in mind that lets us into something you can spend wisely. maybe he thought they need to spy. so it gets the need to make surprise but sam into his high beams at me and nodded that extent. not a big surprise. nonetheless the difference between the times when home which meant was the chance of germany is that today there's the internet. and the internet. which is for the most part you can save manage. stewart it if you will out of the united states it's a big difference. it is but i think that there's this i think that two issues. theres the issue of espionage and in just two were simple signal intelligence which is tapping phones intercepting communications
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. it's an education you can't get anywhere else. there's strong, and then there's army strong. try it on at goarmy.com. >>> time has arrived when we reveal teacher of the year contest finalists. we received some wonderful submissions nominating teachers who are really making a difference in your lives and the lives of your kids. >> we had to narrow it down to just three. here they ar along with the women who nominated them, we begin with a teacher whose classroom was destroyed when storms ripped through her tennessee community. ♪ >> i feel that mrs. billie yardley deserves to be teacher of the year because she not only encourages students to not only do their best but think their best. this year has been difficult for her, because over the summer, her classroom collapsed and she lost 30 years' worth of supplies, personal items andhe started over this year with nothing. but she did not give up. >> i think it was 36 years and i have never received such recognition as this. so, just the fact that i was nominated by parents that thought i had made a positive influence on their childr
on a global crusade against it educates scan reports kerry's attacks have more than quadrupled since two thousand and one and the u s began its war on terror the number of attacks on the kelly's has reached a record high. the national consortium for the study of terrorism respoes to terrorism estimates last year alone there were more than eight thousand five hundred years the tax withholding why he killed more than fifteen thousand five hundred people across africa asia and the least. he walked face his incredible surge of violence this year they recorded six thousand civilian deaths here's how tears i want to take a new mop following the us invasion in two thousand and three. the iraqi prime minister is here in washington. he just said his nation is facing a cold war of genocide and that the revolutions in the region have made it works. the line how about you was created not tied in other organizations were able to expel ethan gain ground. will they benefit from the form of state structures. parents now flock to see maria for a safe haven. and for this area is from a deal between the op
to be from the american people were starting to get educated about this issue and starting to organize and protest here we demand others live up to the standard of accountability that we don't hold up to ourselves terrorism is still the main argument american politicians use to justify spy programs but some us authorities of more than submitting its going to fall at least according to the latest comments made by america's second treat all states join kerry said neither he nor the present you ever think that was happening because the system rattled or domestic politics simply because the technology and the ability of that. but the nsa chief keith l a film that question intends to plead ignorance of performing us ambassador said spying on foreign leaders did little to protect national security like some insisted it's actually policymakers including ambassadors who decide to these moments it so i'm a rift is crying in washington's political establishment of a who is responsible for the spying which caused a loss of trust among voters at home and i know he's been rewarded. and a breach of
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